User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Dec 06 2016 17:41 IST RSS 2.0
 
21 to 40 of 7,573    
31 countries join Paris Climate Change agreement 22.9.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
31 countries formally joined the Paris climate change pact on Wednesday, bringing the total number of countries ratifying the treaty to 60 and raising hopes that it will enter into effect by the end of the year. The number is higher than the 55-country threshold needed for the treaty to enter into force. But because together those countries account for just under 48% of total global emissions short of the 55% threshold the agreement isn't expected to take effect until later this year. "I am convinced that the Paris Agreement will enter into force before the end of 2016," Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said at an event on the sidelines of the high-level UN General Assembly gathering. US Secretary of State John Kerry said he is confident of reaching the magic number before the next UN climate conference, which starts November 7 in Marrakech, Morocco. He urged people everywhere "to become warriors for the planet." The world's two biggest emitters, the United States and China, have already ratified the deal. ...
Also found in: [+]
What Gadkari is doing to end India's fuel crisis 13.9.2016 Rediff: Business
India annually spends Rs 4.5 lakh crore on importing petroleum products, and Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari feels methane is a cost-effective import substitution.
Also found in: [+]
Nitin Gadkari pushes for leapfrogging into methanol economy 11.9.2016 ET: Oil & Gas
The government's key think tank, NITI Aayog is seriously exploring about deploying methanol as a possible way to achieve energy independence for India.
Also found in: [+]
Don't limit efforts to address climate change: PM Modi at G-20 7.9.2016 ET: Policy
The Prime Minister said climate change topped the list of global issues that may not seem economic but carry significant economic costs.
Also found in: [+]
UN chief asks nations to accelerate efforts to join Paris pact 4.9.2016 DNA: Urban Tales
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon commended US and China for ratifying the Paris climate change deal on Saturday even as he asked other nations to accelerate national efforts to join the ambitious pact to ensure that it comes into force by the end of this year. "Together, China and the United States, the world's two largest greenhouse gas emitters, represent nearly 38% of global emissions. Now, by formally joining the Paris Agreement, you have added powerful momentum to the drive for the Agreement to enter into force this year," the UN chief said at a ceremony here. Ban congratulated Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Barack Obama as he received the legal instruments for joining the Paris Agreement from the world's two largest greenhouse gas emitters. The UN chief urged all countries to accelerate their national efforts to join the Paris Agreement so that it comes into force by the end of 2016. In the ceremony, Ban noted that another 29 countries representing 16% of global emissions are ...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists find way to convert carbon dioxide to fossil fuels 26.8.2016 DNA: Top News
Climate change is problem and with humans advancing it, along with global warming by injecting about 30 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year, things just look murky. Given that the ideal amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is 0.03 per cent, we need alternatives and fast. Fortunately, there have been groups across the world battling this problem, with the most recent paper published by a group of scientists from the University of Toronto in Canada. They have found a way that they believe will turn the gas into an energy-rich fuel using silicon. Silicon, readily available in sand, is the seventh most-abundant element in the universe and the second most-abundant element in the earth's crust. Not a new idea The idea of converting carbon dioxide emissions to energy isn't new: there's been a global race to discover a material that can efficiently convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water or hydrogen to fuel for decades. However, the chemical stability of carbon dioxide has made it difficult to ...
Also found in: [+]
After scorching heat, Earth likely to get respite in 2017 20.8.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
The Earth is likely to get relief in 2017 from record scorching temperatures that bolstered governments' resolve last year in reaching a deal to combat climate change, scientists said on Wednesday. July was the hottest single month since records began in the 19th century, driven by greenhouse gases and an El Nino event warming the Pacific. And NASA this week cited a 99 percent chance that 2016 will be the warmest year, ahead of 2015 and 2014. In a welcome break, a new annual record is unlikely in 2017 since the effect of El Nino - a phenomenon that warms the eastern Pacific and can disrupt weather patterns worldwide every two-seven years - is fading. "Next year is probably going to be cooler than 2016," said Phil Jones of the Climatic Research Unit at Britain's University of East Anglia. He added there was no sign of a strong La Nina, El Nino's opposite that can cool the planet. In 1998, a powerful El Nino led to a record year of heat and it took until 2005 to surpass the warmth. That hiatus led some ...
Also found in: [+]
Was Venus habitable? 13.8.2016 DNA: Popular News
Ancient Venus may have been habitable, according to a new NASA study that suggests that the planet had a shallow liquid-water ocean and cooler surface temperatures for up to 2 billion years of its early history. The findings were obtained with a computer model of the planet's ancient climate, similar to the type used to predict future climate change on Earth. "These results show ancient Venus may have been a very different place than it is today," said Michael Way, a researcher at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. Venus today has a carbon dioxide atmosphere 90 times as thick as Earth's. There is almost no water vapour. Temperatures reach 462 degrees Celsius at its surface, researchers said. Scientists long have theorised that Venus formed out of ingredients similar to Earth's, but followed a different evolutionary path. Measurements by NASA's Pioneer mission to Venus in the 1980s first suggested Venus originally may have had an ocean. However, since Venus is closer to the Sun ...
Also found in: [+]
Global Warming: Sea levels hit record high in 2015 4.8.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
Global heat, greenhouse gases and sea levels all climbed to record highs last year, making 2015 the worst in modern times across a range of key environmental indicators, international scientists said today. A dire picture of the Earth's health is painted in the State of the Climate report, a peer-reviewed 300-page tome that comes out once a year and is compiled by 450 scientists from around the world. The record heat that the planet experienced last year was driven partially by global warming, and was exacerbated by the ocean heating trend known as El Nino, it said. El Nino, which just ended in July, was one of the strongest the Earth has seen "since at least 1950," said the report, led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information. "This 'annual physical' of Earth's climate system showed us that 2015's climate was shaped both by long-term change and an El Nino event," said Thomas Karl, director of the NOAA division. "Last year's El Nino was ...
Also found in: [+]
Agriculture contributed to 18 per cent of emissions in 2010: Lok Sabha told 26.7.2016 ET: Agriculture
Environment Minister Anil Madhav Dave said in a written reply that human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), including those from the agriculture sector.
Also found in: [+]
Earth on track to have the hottest year on record 23.7.2016 DNA: Evolutions
June marked the 14th straight month of highest recorded heat on Earth.
Also found in: [+]
States and Urban Local Bodies urged to address climate change concerns 22.7.2016 Govt of india: PIB
The need for State Governments and Urban Local Bodies to be alive to the reality of adverse impacts of climate change and take necessary measures to address the same was emphasized at a Conference
Also found in: [+]
Global Warming: NOAA scientists say last month was the hottest June on record 20.7.2016 DNA: Evolutions
"This marks the 14th consecutive month the monthly global temperature record has been broken, the longest such streak in the 137-year record," said US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
Also found in: [+]
Reduction of Greenhouse Gases 18.7.2016 Govt of india: PIB
In a declaration in 2009, India announced a voluntary goal of reducing the emissions intensity of its GDP by 20–25%, over 2005 levels, by 2020, despite having no binding mitigation obligations as per the Convention. Subsequently, India in its Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
Also found in: [+]
Climate change warming Asian waters, altering monsoon: Study 2.7.2016 ET: Agriculture
Getting the monsoon forecast right is a challenge, thanks to the complex, poorly understood, ways in which South Asia's monsoon rains are influenced by multiple factors.
Also found in: [+]
MNRE sets Target of Setting up One Lakh Family type Biogas Plants for FY 2016-17 27.6.2016 Govt of india: PIB
With an objective to provide clean gaseous fuel for cooking and organic bio-manure as a by-product, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) has allocated to the States /UTs an annual target of setting up one lakh family size biogas plants (1 m3 to 6 m3capacity) for the current year, 2016-17.
Also found in: [+]
Brexit could mar Paris Agreement success 26.6.2016 Rediff: Business
EU operates as one block at the climate change negotiations and takes a single greenhouse gas emission reduction target under the Paris Agreement
Also found in: [+]
Study shows how climate can make you violent 25.6.2016 DNA: Urban Tales
Scientists have long struggled to explain why cool heads won't be able to prevail in a hotter world and now, a team of researchers has come up with a model that could help explain why. Developed by Paul van Lange of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam along with Maria I. Rinderu and Brad Bushman, this new model, called CLASH (CLimate Aggression, and Self-control in Humans), goes beyond the simple fact that hotter temperatures seem to be linked to more aggressive The researchers believe that hot climates and less variation in seasonal temperatures lead to a faster life strategy, less focus on the future, and less self-control - all of which contribute to more aggression and violence. "Climate shapes how people live, it affects the culture in ways that we don't think about in our daily lives," said lead author Van Lange. "We believe our model can help explain the impact of climate on rates of violence in different parts of the world." Many studies have shown that levels of violence and aggression are higher in ...
Also found in: [+]
Global Warming: John Kerry sees looming climate catastrophe after Arctic visit 19.6.2016 DNA: Top News
Standing near Greenland's Jakobshavn glacier, the reputed source of the iceberg that sank the Titanic over a century ago, U.S Secretary of State John Kerry saw evidence of another looming catastrophe. Giant icebergs broken off from the glacier seemed to groan as they drifted behind him, signaling eventual rising oceans that scientists warn will submerge islands and populated coastal region. Briefed by researchers aboard a Royal Danish Navy patrol ship, Kerry appeared stunned by how fast the ice sheets are melting. He was struck by the more dire warnings he heard about the same process underway in more remote Antarctica. "This has been a significant eye-opener for me and I've spent 25 years or more engaged in this issue," Kerry said on the deck of the ship with Danish Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen during a two-day visit that ended late on Friday. Icebergs that broke off from the Jakobshavn Glacier are seen in the water below an aircraft on July 14, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Kerry made his first ...
Also found in: [+]
Cheap global gas, coal prices won't deter investment into renewables: Energy report 14.6.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
Weak coal and gas prices will not stop record investment in renewables over the coming decades as the cost of generating clean energy drops, a key energy report said. Renewables are set to attract $7.8 trillion (nearly Rs 518.9 lakh crore) by 2040, nearly four times as much as carbon-based power over the same period, the New Energy Outlook 2016 forecast said. The impact of cheap gas and coal will be offset, it projected, by drops of 41 and 60%, respectively, in the price of power from wind and solar panels. Compared to a year ago, the report projects "significantly lower" coal and gas prices, said Jon Moore, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the research unit which conducted the study. "But, strikingly, (the report) still shows rapid transition towards clean power." The shift, however, to a low-carbon energy sector will not happen quickly enough to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), much less the more ambitious goal embraced by the world's nations last ...
Also found in: [+]
21 to 40 of 7,573