User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Sep 22 2016 16:21 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Global Warming: John Kerry sees looming climate catastrophe after Arctic visit 19.6.2016 DNA: Top News
Standing near Greenland's Jakobshavn glacier, the reputed source of the iceberg that sank the Titanic over a century ago, U.S Secretary of State John Kerry saw evidence of another looming catastrophe. Giant icebergs broken off from the glacier seemed to groan as they drifted behind him, signaling eventual rising oceans that scientists warn will submerge islands and populated coastal region. Briefed by researchers aboard a Royal Danish Navy patrol ship, Kerry appeared stunned by how fast the ice sheets are melting. He was struck by the more dire warnings he heard about the same process underway in more remote Antarctica. "This has been a significant eye-opener for me and I've spent 25 years or more engaged in this issue," Kerry said on the deck of the ship with Danish Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen during a two-day visit that ended late on Friday. Icebergs that broke off from the Jakobshavn Glacier are seen in the water below an aircraft on July 14, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Kerry made his first ...
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Cheap global gas, coal prices won't deter investment into renewables: Energy report 14.6.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
Weak coal and gas prices will not stop record investment in renewables over the coming decades as the cost of generating clean energy drops, a key energy report said. Renewables are set to attract $7.8 trillion (nearly Rs 518.9 lakh crore) by 2040, nearly four times as much as carbon-based power over the same period, the New Energy Outlook 2016 forecast said. The impact of cheap gas and coal will be offset, it projected, by drops of 41 and 60%, respectively, in the price of power from wind and solar panels. Compared to a year ago, the report projects "significantly lower" coal and gas prices, said Jon Moore, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the research unit which conducted the study. "But, strikingly, (the report) still shows rapid transition towards clean power." The shift, however, to a low-carbon energy sector will not happen quickly enough to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), much less the more ambitious goal embraced by the world's nations last ...
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Moody's expects COP21 agreement to propel wind power installations in India, Brazil and, Africa 9.6.2016 ET: Power
COP 21, together with the need for clean energy, should support growth in these markets said Moody’s in a statement on Thursday.
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India-US Joint Statement during the visit of Prime Minister to USA (The United States and India: Enduring Global Partners in the 21st Century) 8.6.2016 Govt of india: PIB
1. The Prime Minister of India Narendra Modi and the President of the United States of America Barack Obama met today in the White House during an official working visit of Prime Minister Modi to the United States. Marking their
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India-US Joint Statement during the visit of Prime Minister to USA (The United States and India: Enduring Global Partners in the 21st Century) June 07, 2016 8.6.2016 Govt of india: PIB
India-US Joint Statement during the visit of Prime Minister to USA (The United States and India: Enduring Global Partners in the 21st Century) June 07, 2016
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Terrorism, cyber security, climate change dominate Modi-Obama talks 8.6.2016 Rediff: News
Seeking to boost the strategic ties, India and the US finalised the text of the Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Agreement.
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World Environment Day observed in State 7.6.2016 The Assam Tribune
World Environment Day observed in State
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ISRO leads charge for space agency collaboration to prevent global warming 4.6.2016 DNA: Opinion
For the first time, under the impetus of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the French Space Agency (CNES), space agencies of more than 60 countries agreed to engage their satellites, to coordinate their methods and their data to monitor human-induced greenhouse gas emissions. The COP21 climate conference held in Paris last December acted as a wake-up call in this context. Without satellites, the reality of global warming would not have been recognised and the subsequent historic agreement at the United Nations headquarters in New York on April 22, 2016 would not have been signed. Out of the 50 essential climate variables being monitored today, 26 - including rising sea level, sea ice extent and greenhouse gas concentrations in all layers of the atmosphere - can be measured only from space. The key to effectively implementing the Paris Agreement lies in the ability to verify that nations are fulfilling their commitments to curb greenhouse gas emissions and only satellites can do ...
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World’s Space Agencies unite to face the Climate Challenge 4.6.2016 Govt of india: PIB
World’s Space Agencies unite to face the Climate Challenge
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Why Antarctica isn't facing global warming threats? 31.5.2016 Sify Finance
, May 31 (ANI): Guess why Antarctica is not melting down even after such drastic human-driven climate change.
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CERN's Cloud experiment provide clues to better climate predictions 28.5.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
Scientists have uncovered the processes behind the formation and evolution of small atmospheric particles free from the influence of pollution, that can help create accurate models to predict global climate change. Clouds and aerosols - small airborne particles that can become the seeds upon which clouds form - are essential to climate predictions because they reflect sunlight back into space. Reflecting light away from Earth can have a cooling effect, masking some of the warming caused by greenhouse gases, researchers said. "The best estimate is that about one-third of the warming by greenhouse gas emissions is masked by this aerosol cooling, but the fraction could be as large as half and as little as almost nothing," said Neil Donahue from Carnegie Mellon University in the US. In order to have complete climate prediction models, scientists need to incorporate clouds and aerosols into their calculations, but understanding how new aerosol particles form and grow in the atmosphere, and how they affect ...
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'Honeymoon over', rules for UN climate pact may take two years 26.5.2016 DNA: Top News
A first United Nations meeting on implementing a 2015 global agreement to combat climate change showed it could take two years to work out a detailed rule book for a sweeping shift from fossil fuels, delegates said. The May 16-26 talks marked a return to technical work and the end of a "honeymoon period" since the Paris Agreement was worked out by almost 200 nations in December to cut greenhouse gas emissions and limit rising temperatures. "My bet is 2018, everything will be done (in) a maximum two years," Laurence Tubiana, France's climate ambassador, told Reuters when asked how long it would take to negotiate a set of rules. Several other delegates gave similar estimates. Tubiana said the Bonn talks had not exposed big, unexpected problems with the Paris text that could mean an even longer haul. "There was no shouting, no crying," she said. Details left vague by the 31-page Paris Agreement include how countries will report and monitor their domestic pledges to curb greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to ...
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Donald Trump unlikely to be able to renegotiate climate deal: UN Climate Chief 25.5.2016 DNA: Popular News
Donald Trump would be "highly unlikely" to be able to renegotiate the global accord on climate change if elected US president, the UN's climate chief said on Wednesday, as doing so would require the agreement of 195 countries. Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, told Reuters earlier this month he was "not a big fan" of the climate accord and would seek to renegotiate elements of the deal. "As we all know, Donald Trump relishes making very dramatic statements on many issues, so it is not surprising, but it is highly unlikely that that would be possible," Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, told journalists at the Carbon Expo event in Cologne. The accord, struck in Paris last December, saw countries agree to cut greenhouse gas emissions from 2020 with the aim of limiting the rise in the global average temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius. "An agreement that has been adopted by 195 countries would require 195 ...
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U.S. official says India has addressed nuclear concerns 24.5.2016 Sify Finance
By Patricia Zengerle
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Oil company records from 1960s reveal patents to reduce CO2 emissions in cars 20.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

ExxonMobil and others pursued research into technologies, yet blocked government efforts to fight climate change for more than 50 years, findings show

The forerunners of ExxonMobil patented technologies for electric cars and low emissions vehicles as early as 1963 – even as the oil industry lobby tried to squash government funding for such research, according to a trove of newly discovered records.

Patent records reveal oil companies actively pursued research into technologies to cut carbon dioxide emissions that cause climate change from the 1960s – including early versions of the batteries now deployed to power electric cars such as the Tesla.

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Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate UN climate deal causes dismay abroad 18.5.2016 DNA: Opinion
Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate the global accord on climate change if elected US president caused dismay abroad on Wednesday, with many experts saying it was in his interests to embrace a deal seeking to end dependence on fossil fuels. US insistence on renegotiation could unravel a 195-nation compromise to curb greenhouse gas emissions reached in Paris in December after fraught talks between nations as different as China, the United States, small island states and OPEC members. "The Paris Agreement is as much in the United States' interests as any other country," said Tony de Brum, ambassador for climate change of the Marshall Islands who, as his country's foreign minister, helped broker the UN deal. "Seeking to unravel it would not only threaten the US economy, damage its environment, and weaken its security, but it would do a great disservice to all of humanity," he said. Republican presidential contender Trump told Reuters on Tuesday he was "not a big fan" of the climate accord and said that ...
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Global warming will hit poorer countries hardest, research finds 17.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

Tropical regions likely to suffer biggest increase in hot days and extreme weather because of climate change, say scientists

New evidence that poorer countries will suffer the worst effects of climate change has shown that the number of hot days in tropical developing countries is likely to increase markedly as global warming takes hold.

It has long been expected that poor people would bear the brunt of climate change, largely because so many more of the world’s poorest live in tropical latitudes whereas, wealthier people tend to live in more temperate regions.

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Shell creates green energy division to invest in wind power 15.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Insiders say oil firm’s New Energies renewables arm could grow very big, but not for a decade or more

Shell, Europe’s largest oil company, has established a separate division, New Energies, to invest in renewable and low-carbon power.

The move emerged days after experts at Chatham House warned international oil companies they must transform their business or face a “short, brutal” end within 10 years.

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US unveils first federal methane regulations 13.5.2016 TOI: Intl Business
Washington, May 12, 2016 (AFP) -The United States on Thursday unveiled the first federal regulations on methane -- a powerful greenhouse gas that accelerates global warming -- aimed at reducing emissions from new oil and gas operations.
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Bhutan global role model on climate change: US 12.5.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
Bhutan is a global role model on issues like climate change and environmental conversation as the country absorbs three times more carbon dioxide than it emits, the US has said. Bhutan is investing in clean energy and its constitution requires the country to maintain at least 60% forest cover and it now boasts 72% coverage, Indian-American Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia, Nisha Desai Biswal told lawmakers during a Congressional hearing on South Asia, convened by the House Foreign Affairs Committee. "Bhutan is a global role model on issues like climate change and environmental conservation" Biswal said. It actually absorbs three times more carbon dioxide than it emits, making the country carbon negative and it has pledged to remain carbon neutral in perpetuity, she said. "Despite its small size, Bhutan also contributes to global peacekeeping operations, with a small number of personnel that serve in eight different UN missions worldwide - and it looks to expand its contributions ...
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