User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Jan 19 2017 03:08 IST RSS 2.0
 
21 to 40 of 7,586    
US must respect 'irreversible' climate deal, says French President Hollande 15.11.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
French President Francois Hollande on Tuesday urged the United States to respect the "irreversible" Paris Agreement on climate change, and said France will lead a dialogue on the topic with President-elect Donald Trump "on behalf of the 100 countries that have ratified" the deal. Speaking to a UN climate conference in Morocco, Hollande praised US President Barack Obama for his role in getting the landmark pact adopted in the French capital last year. "The United States, the most powerful economy in the world, the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, must respect the commitments that were made," he said. "It's not simply their duty, it's in their interest." Scientists say oil and other fossil fuels are the biggest contributors to man-made warming. Trump, however, has called global warming a "hoax" and pledged during his campaign to "cancel" the Paris deal. "The agreement was historic," Hollande said. "But what we must say here is that this agreement is irreversible." Earlier, UN Secretary-General ...
Also found in: [+]
International body pats India for its transition to combat climate change 10.11.2016 Sify Finance
India's growth story in renewable energy sector is being monitored globally and organisations are confident that India will exceed its National Determined Contribution (NDC) targets.
Also found in: [+]
Sessions at COP 22 Focus on Afforestation, Ecosystem and Climate Change 10.11.2016 Govt of india: PIB
On the third day of Conference of Parties (COP-22) on Wednesday, being held at Marrakech in Morocco, the India Pavilion witnessed three side-events that focused on the initiatives in afforestation and REDD+ in India, ecosystem and climate change and sustainable transportation.
Also found in: [+]
No doubt world will shift to low emissions, says UN climate chief 7.11.2016 DNA: Urban Tales
Climate negotiators started work on Monday on implementing the Paris Agreement on global warming amid uncertainty over how the US election will impact the landmark deal as temperatures and greenhouse gases soar to new heights. UN climate chief Patricia Espinosa told delegates in the rain-soaked Moroccan city of Marrakech that "no politician or citizen, no business manager or investor" can doubt that the world is determined to shift toward a "low-emission, resilient society." So far, 100 countries have formally joined the agreement adopted last year in Paris, including top polluters China, the United States, the European Union and India. However, US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has said he would "cancel" the deal if he wins the election this week. His opponent, Hillary Clinton, backs the climate policies of President Barack Obama's government. "Achieving the aims and ambitions of the Paris Agreement is not a given," Espinosa said. "The peaking of global emissions is urgent, as is ...
Also found in: [+]
Big Oil pledges $1 bln for gas technologies to fight climate change 4.11.2016 Sify Finance
By Karolin Schaps and Ron Bousso
Also found in: [+]
Historic Paris climate deal enters into force 4.11.2016 DNA: Top News
A worldwide pact to battle global warming entered into force on Friday, just a week before nations reassemble to discuss how to make good on their promises to cut planet-warming greenhouse gases. Dubbed the Paris Agreement, it is the first-ever deal binding all the world's nations, rich and poor, to a commitment to cap global warming caused mainly from the burning of coal, oil and gas. "A historic day for the planet," said the office of President Francois Hollande of France, host to the 2015 negotiations that yielded the breakthrough pact. "Humanity will look back on November 4, 2016, as the day that countries of the world shut the door on inevitable climate disaster," UN climate chief Patricia Espinosa and Moroccan Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar said in a joint statement. Mezouar will preside over the UN meeting opening in Marrakesh on Monday. "It is also a moment to look ahead with sober assessment and renewed will over the task ahead," they said. This meant drastically and urgently cutting ...
Also found in: [+]
The Candidates on Climate Change 2.11.2016 FactCheck
We delve into the presidential candidates' stances and claims on an issue that has received little attention in this campaign.
Also found in: [+]
Climate change makes fish swim towards predators 25.10.2016 DNA: Opinion
Climate change may impair survival instincts of fish and can make them swim towards their predators, according to a new study which found that high levels of carbon dioxide disrupts their sense of smell, hearing and vision. According to the scientists at University of Exeter in the UK, these abnormal behaviours have been linked to the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) on how the brain processes signals from sensory organs. High CO2 levels can impair the way fish behave making them swim towards predator smells instead of away and even ignoring the sounds that normally deter them from risky habitats. CO2 levels are predicted to be 2.5 times higher in the oceans by the end of this century, researchers said. They believe that fish farms may be the key to establishing the long-term impact of CO2 on marine life. In the study, researchers show that farmed fish often live in CO2 conditions 10 times higher than their wild cousins. The scientists believe that further study of farmed fish - which already provides as ...
Also found in: [+]
Company climate change plans too weak to meet Paris goals - survey 25.10.2016 Sify Finance
OSLO (Reuters) - Plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions by big companies represent only a quarter of the amounts needed to limit global warming under targets agreed last year by almost 200 nations,
Also found in: [+]
Scientists find 500 U.S. seabed vents of powerful greenhouse gas 20.10.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
Scientists have found 500 seabed vents bubbling methane into the Pacific Ocean off the United States, roughly doubling the number of known U.S. seeps of the powerful greenhouse gas, a study showed on Wednesday. Methane naturally escapes from the seafloor in many places around the world and can stoke global warming if it reaches the atmosphere. Worldwide, scientists are trying to see if rising ocean temperatures cause more leaks. "It appears that the entire coast of Washington, Oregon and California is a giant methane seep," Robert Ballard, who is famed for finding the wreck of the Titanic and has now discovered the 500 new seeps, said in a statement. "The discoveries double to about 1,000 the number of such events now known to exist along the continental margins of the USA," the statement said. Nicole Raineault, Director of Science Operations with Ballard's Ocean Exploration Trust, said it was unknown how long the seeps had been active, what triggered them and how much, if any of the gas, reached the ...
Also found in: [+]
Historic deal reached to cut greenhouse gas emissions 17.10.2016 Rediff: Business
According to the amendment adopted by nations, developed countries will reduce HFCs use first, followed by China along with a large number of countries.
Also found in: [+]
World should support India generously for development: Report 22.9.2016 TOI: India
India should be given a "generous support package" to pursue its ambitious developmental projects as it has done less harm to the climate than most of the countries despite having 18 per cent share of the world's population, according to an international report.
Also found in: [+]
Wealthy countries should help India to pursue a low-carbon development path: Report 22.9.2016 ET: Policy
The report pointed out that India, with per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of just $1,600, has an urgent need for economic development.
Also found in: [+]
31 countries join Paris Climate Change agreement 22.9.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
31 countries formally joined the Paris climate change pact on Wednesday, bringing the total number of countries ratifying the treaty to 60 and raising hopes that it will enter into effect by the end of the year. The number is higher than the 55-country threshold needed for the treaty to enter into force. But because together those countries account for just under 48% of total global emissions short of the 55% threshold the agreement isn't expected to take effect until later this year. "I am convinced that the Paris Agreement will enter into force before the end of 2016," Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said at an event on the sidelines of the high-level UN General Assembly gathering. US Secretary of State John Kerry said he is confident of reaching the magic number before the next UN climate conference, which starts November 7 in Marrakech, Morocco. He urged people everywhere "to become warriors for the planet." The world's two biggest emitters, the United States and China, have already ratified the deal. ...
Also found in: [+]
What Gadkari is doing to end India's fuel crisis 13.9.2016 Rediff: Business
India annually spends Rs 4.5 lakh crore on importing petroleum products, and Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari feels methane is a cost-effective import substitution.
Also found in: [+]
Nitin Gadkari pushes for leapfrogging into methanol economy 11.9.2016 ET: Oil & Gas
The government's key think tank, NITI Aayog is seriously exploring about deploying methanol as a possible way to achieve energy independence for India.
Also found in: [+]
Don't limit efforts to address climate change: PM Modi at G-20 7.9.2016 ET: Policy
The Prime Minister said climate change topped the list of global issues that may not seem economic but carry significant economic costs.
Also found in: [+]
UN chief asks nations to accelerate efforts to join Paris pact 4.9.2016 DNA: Urban Tales
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon commended US and China for ratifying the Paris climate change deal on Saturday even as he asked other nations to accelerate national efforts to join the ambitious pact to ensure that it comes into force by the end of this year. "Together, China and the United States, the world's two largest greenhouse gas emitters, represent nearly 38% of global emissions. Now, by formally joining the Paris Agreement, you have added powerful momentum to the drive for the Agreement to enter into force this year," the UN chief said at a ceremony here. Ban congratulated Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Barack Obama as he received the legal instruments for joining the Paris Agreement from the world's two largest greenhouse gas emitters. The UN chief urged all countries to accelerate their national efforts to join the Paris Agreement so that it comes into force by the end of 2016. In the ceremony, Ban noted that another 29 countries representing 16% of global emissions are ...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists find way to convert carbon dioxide to fossil fuels 26.8.2016 DNA: Top News
Climate change is problem and with humans advancing it, along with global warming by injecting about 30 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year, things just look murky. Given that the ideal amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is 0.03 per cent, we need alternatives and fast. Fortunately, there have been groups across the world battling this problem, with the most recent paper published by a group of scientists from the University of Toronto in Canada. They have found a way that they believe will turn the gas into an energy-rich fuel using silicon. Silicon, readily available in sand, is the seventh most-abundant element in the universe and the second most-abundant element in the earth's crust. Not a new idea The idea of converting carbon dioxide emissions to energy isn't new: there's been a global race to discover a material that can efficiently convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water or hydrogen to fuel for decades. However, the chemical stability of carbon dioxide has made it difficult to ...
Also found in: [+]
After scorching heat, Earth likely to get respite in 2017 20.8.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
The Earth is likely to get relief in 2017 from record scorching temperatures that bolstered governments' resolve last year in reaching a deal to combat climate change, scientists said on Wednesday. July was the hottest single month since records began in the 19th century, driven by greenhouse gases and an El Nino event warming the Pacific. And NASA this week cited a 99 percent chance that 2016 will be the warmest year, ahead of 2015 and 2014. In a welcome break, a new annual record is unlikely in 2017 since the effect of El Nino - a phenomenon that warms the eastern Pacific and can disrupt weather patterns worldwide every two-seven years - is fading. "Next year is probably going to be cooler than 2016," said Phil Jones of the Climatic Research Unit at Britain's University of East Anglia. He added there was no sign of a strong La Nina, El Nino's opposite that can cool the planet. In 1998, a powerful El Nino led to a record year of heat and it took until 2005 to surpass the warmth. That hiatus led some ...
Also found in: [+]
21 to 40 of 7,586