User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Greenhouse Gases
Last updated: Jul 26 2016 19:53 IST RSS 2.0
 
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'Honeymoon over', rules for UN climate pact may take two years 26.5.2016 DNA: Top News
A first United Nations meeting on implementing a 2015 global agreement to combat climate change showed it could take two years to work out a detailed rule book for a sweeping shift from fossil fuels, delegates said. The May 16-26 talks marked a return to technical work and the end of a "honeymoon period" since the Paris Agreement was worked out by almost 200 nations in December to cut greenhouse gas emissions and limit rising temperatures. "My bet is 2018, everything will be done (in) a maximum two years," Laurence Tubiana, France's climate ambassador, told Reuters when asked how long it would take to negotiate a set of rules. Several other delegates gave similar estimates. Tubiana said the Bonn talks had not exposed big, unexpected problems with the Paris text that could mean an even longer haul. "There was no shouting, no crying," she said. Details left vague by the 31-page Paris Agreement include how countries will report and monitor their domestic pledges to curb greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to ...
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Donald Trump unlikely to be able to renegotiate climate deal: UN Climate Chief 25.5.2016 DNA: Popular News
Donald Trump would be "highly unlikely" to be able to renegotiate the global accord on climate change if elected US president, the UN's climate chief said on Wednesday, as doing so would require the agreement of 195 countries. Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, told Reuters earlier this month he was "not a big fan" of the climate accord and would seek to renegotiate elements of the deal. "As we all know, Donald Trump relishes making very dramatic statements on many issues, so it is not surprising, but it is highly unlikely that that would be possible," Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, told journalists at the Carbon Expo event in Cologne. The accord, struck in Paris last December, saw countries agree to cut greenhouse gas emissions from 2020 with the aim of limiting the rise in the global average temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius. "An agreement that has been adopted by 195 countries would require 195 ...
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U.S. official says India has addressed nuclear concerns 24.5.2016 Sify Finance
By Patricia Zengerle
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Oil company records from 1960s reveal patents to reduce CO2 emissions in cars 20.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

ExxonMobil and others pursued research into technologies, yet blocked government efforts to fight climate change for more than 50 years, findings show

The forerunners of ExxonMobil patented technologies for electric cars and low emissions vehicles as early as 1963 – even as the oil industry lobby tried to squash government funding for such research, according to a trove of newly discovered records.

Patent records reveal oil companies actively pursued research into technologies to cut carbon dioxide emissions that cause climate change from the 1960s – including early versions of the batteries now deployed to power electric cars such as the Tesla.

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Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate UN climate deal causes dismay abroad 18.5.2016 DNA: Opinion
Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate the global accord on climate change if elected US president caused dismay abroad on Wednesday, with many experts saying it was in his interests to embrace a deal seeking to end dependence on fossil fuels. US insistence on renegotiation could unravel a 195-nation compromise to curb greenhouse gas emissions reached in Paris in December after fraught talks between nations as different as China, the United States, small island states and OPEC members. "The Paris Agreement is as much in the United States' interests as any other country," said Tony de Brum, ambassador for climate change of the Marshall Islands who, as his country's foreign minister, helped broker the UN deal. "Seeking to unravel it would not only threaten the US economy, damage its environment, and weaken its security, but it would do a great disservice to all of humanity," he said. Republican presidential contender Trump told Reuters on Tuesday he was "not a big fan" of the climate accord and said that ...
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Global warming will hit poorer countries hardest, research finds 17.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

Tropical regions likely to suffer biggest increase in hot days and extreme weather because of climate change, say scientists

New evidence that poorer countries will suffer the worst effects of climate change has shown that the number of hot days in tropical developing countries is likely to increase markedly as global warming takes hold.

It has long been expected that poor people would bear the brunt of climate change, largely because so many more of the world’s poorest live in tropical latitudes whereas, wealthier people tend to live in more temperate regions.

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Shell creates green energy division to invest in wind power 15.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Insiders say oil firm’s New Energies renewables arm could grow very big, but not for a decade or more

Shell, Europe’s largest oil company, has established a separate division, New Energies, to invest in renewable and low-carbon power.

The move emerged days after experts at Chatham House warned international oil companies they must transform their business or face a “short, brutal” end within 10 years.

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US unveils first federal methane regulations 13.5.2016 TOI: Intl Business
Washington, May 12, 2016 (AFP) -The United States on Thursday unveiled the first federal regulations on methane -- a powerful greenhouse gas that accelerates global warming -- aimed at reducing emissions from new oil and gas operations.
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Bhutan global role model on climate change: US 12.5.2016 DNA: Recent Columns
Bhutan is a global role model on issues like climate change and environmental conversation as the country absorbs three times more carbon dioxide than it emits, the US has said. Bhutan is investing in clean energy and its constitution requires the country to maintain at least 60% forest cover and it now boasts 72% coverage, Indian-American Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asia, Nisha Desai Biswal told lawmakers during a Congressional hearing on South Asia, convened by the House Foreign Affairs Committee. "Bhutan is a global role model on issues like climate change and environmental conservation" Biswal said. It actually absorbs three times more carbon dioxide than it emits, making the country carbon negative and it has pledged to remain carbon neutral in perpetuity, she said. "Despite its small size, Bhutan also contributes to global peacekeeping operations, with a small number of personnel that serve in eight different UN missions worldwide - and it looks to expand its contributions ...
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See Earth’s temperature spiral toward 2C rise - graphic 10.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Climate Central: A new graphic shows Earth’s temperatures spiralling toward the 2C global warming limit

The steady rise of Earth’s temperature as greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and trap more and more heat is sending the planet spiraling closer to the point where warming’s catastrophic consequences may be all but assured.

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Plans for coal-fired power in Asia are 'disaster for planet' warns World Bank 5.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Experts have offered stark warnings that proposed power plants in India, China, Vietnam and Indonesia would blow Paris climate deal if they move ahead

Plans to build more coal-fired power plants in Asia would be a “disaster for the planet” and overwhelm the deal forged at Paris to fight climate change, the president of the World Bank said on Thursday.

In an unusually stark warning, the World Bank president, Jim Yong Kim, noted that countries in south and south-east Asia were on track to build hundreds more coal-fired power plants in the next 20 years – despite promises made at Paris to cut greenhouse gas emissions and pivot to a clean energy future.

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Tory MPs tell Cameron to accept steep cuts needed for UK's fifth carbon budget 5.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Climate change is a problem that cannot wait, 20 backbenchers say in their statement to PM, urging him to accept cuts in greenhouse gas emissions

Twenty Conservative MPs have written to the prime minister urging him to accept the steep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions required by the UK’s ‘fifth carbon budget’.

On the eve of local elections in several regions, and the poll for the next London mayor, the MPs have made a strong statement that climate change is a problem that cannot wait.

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India's answer to global warming: Cows that belch less 4.5.2016 TOI: India
India's 280 million cows and 200 million more ruminant animals send 13 million tons of methane into the atmosphere every year. And thus, government scientists are working hard to reduce carbon emissions by making cows less flatulent.
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Why today’s global warming has roots in Indonesia’s genocidal past | Joshua Oppenheimer 3.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest
The mass killings in 1965 live on in global emissions from forced forest fires – and through human rights abuses in the palm oil fields There has been tremendous concern over the ways climate change will affect human rights, but little attention to how human rights abuse affects our global climate. Fifty years ago, Indonesia went through a genocide. The massacres may be relatively unknown, but in a terrible way the destruction continues, and threatens us all. In 1965, the Indonesian army organised paramilitary death squads and exterminated between 500,000 and 1 million people who had hastily been identified as enemies of General Suharto’s new military dictatorship. Today, the killers and their protégés are comfortable establishment figures whose impunity, political power and capacity for intimidation ...
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Phasing out coal, oil and gas extraction in US would drastically cut emissions 3.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

The reduction would slash greenhouse gas emissions by 100m tonnes a year by 2030 and even more after that, comparing well to other proposed measures

Phasing out coal, oil and gas extraction on US federal land would cut greenhouse gas emissions by 100m tonnes a year by 2030 and even more after then, providing a useful brake to careening climate change, according to a new study.

A quarter of all fossil fuel extraction in the US occurs on the 650m acres of land under federal management. The outer shelf of the US’ marine territory, used for oil and gas drilling, is also under federal control.

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MPs urge parliament to approve 2030 carbon target 27.4.2016 Guardian: Environment

Committee says UK ‘cannot afford further delays’ in setting fifth carbon budget in the wake of the signing of the Paris agreement on climate change

The government should approve the UK’s 2030s carbon target in the wake of the signing of the Paris agreement on climate change, an influential committee of MPs has urged.

The so-called fifth carbon budget sets a limit on the quantity of greenhouse gases that can be produced across the country between 2028 and 2032, as a way of meeting national and international commitments on combating global warming.

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Government walks the talk on Climate Change, Distributes over 10 Crore Led Bulbs under Ujala 26.4.2016 Govt of india: PIB
The Government of India has distributed over 10 crore LED bulbs across the country under the UnnatJyoti by Affordable LEDs for All (UJALA) scheme today.
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Paris climate deal: countries with about half of global emissions to join this year 26.4.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

At least 34 countries representing 49% of greenhouse gas emissions formally joined the agreement, bringing it ‘within striking distance’ of entering into force

The White House has said countries accounting for about half of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions would join the Paris climate agreement this year, bringing the agreement “within striking distance” of entering into force.

At least 34 countries representing 49% of greenhouse gas emissions formally joined the agreement, or committed to joining the agreement as early as possible this year at a high-profile signing ceremony at the United Nations last Friday.

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India has made strides in tackling climate change: TERI chief 23.4.2016 TOI: Cities
New Delhi, Apr 23 () India has made strides towards providing "real solutions" to tackle climate change, TERI Director General Ajay Mathur said today, a day after the country signed the Paris accord along with more than 170 nations.
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Indian signs Paris agreement along with over 170 world 23.4.2016 Rediff: News
India on Friday signed the historic Paris climate agreement in the United Nations along with more than 170 nations.
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