User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Emissions
Last updated: Jun 24 2017 09:50 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Global warming means more sweltering days 24.6.2017 DNA: Urban Tales
Extremely hot days, when temperatures soar to 95 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, can be miserable. Crops wilt in the fields. Electric grids strain to keep pace with demand. People are at greater risk of dying. And those hot temperatures are expected to be much more frequent in the coming decades. A new analysis from the Climate Impact Lab examined how extremely hot days are expected to multiply this century if countries take moderate climate action. In this scenario, countries would take some measures, but not drastic ones, to curb emissions — roughly the trajectory of the current pledges under the Paris climate agreement. The resulting global warming would still cause significant shifts for many cities. In Washington, from 1986 to 2005, an average of seven days each year had temperatures of at least 95 degrees. By the end of the century, the city can expect 29 of these extremely hot days per year, on average. (The likely range is 14 to 46 hot days per year.) Phoenix is used to the heat, averaging 124 days ...
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Analysis: America’s hungriest wind and solar power users - big companies 21.6.2017 Sify Finance
By Nichola Groom
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Oil firms could waste trillions if climate targets reached - report 21.6.2017 Sify Finance
By Ron Bousso
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Natural calamities in Asia, Pacific threat to infra: ADB 18.6.2017 ET: Infrastructure
India's future infrastructure investment requirements rise to 8.8 per cent of the gross domestic product (GDP) when adjusted for climate resilience, ADB said.
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Global energy demand stumbles for third year - BP 13.6.2017 Sify Finance
By Ron Bousso
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If Modi can pull this off, he'll be a true world leader 6.6.2017 Rediff: Top Stories (India)
'We should credit Prime Minister Modi with having foresight and courage and showing leadership on climate change.'
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Airlines hold fast to global consensus in fractured world 6.6.2017 Sify Finance
By Victoria Bryan and Brad Haynes
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Donald Trump wants to 'stay engaged' on climate: Rex Tillerson 5.6.2017 TOI: The United States
Tillerson, who reports have suggested was among those who counselled Trump not to scrap the deal, said last week the United States would pursue unilateral efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions despite plans to pull out of the Paris accord.
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World pledges to save 'Mother Earth' despite Trump's snub to climate pact 3.6.2017 Sify Finance
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Why did Trump attack India? 3.6.2017 Rediff: News
Trump's diatribe against India in his speech on the Paris Agreement is hard to explain, especially when a Modi-Trump meeting is supposedly on the cards, says Ambassador T P Sreenivasan.
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Shifting onus on China, India unfair, say experts 3.6.2017 TOI: India
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How Donald Trump got everything wrong 3.6.2017 DNA: Urban Tales
President Donald Trump's announcement to walk out of the Paris Climate Accord, was laced with blunt criticism of India, which he said, was "receiving billions and billions and billions of dollars in foreign aid from developed countries." However, Trump's claims and barbs against India may be misleading. Think of it. India can double their coal production. We're supposed to get rid of ours. Even Europe is allowed to continue construction of coal plants," Trump said. However, Trump's claims and barbs against India may not only be misleading but may also be completely out of context in so far as the Paris Accord, that was ratified on November 4, 2016, is concerned. Under the terms of the Accord, countries have committed to tackle climate change by submitting Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC), which would dictate the "voluntary" actions they would be undertaking, including cutting greenhouse gas emissions and moving towards green energy. Of the billions of dollars that Trump referred to, ...
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US pull-out will delay climate action: Indian Paris negotiator 3.6.2017 DNA: Urban Tales
The void on climate financing, in the wake of United States' pullout from the Paris climate accord, could potentially slow down acceleration of India's efforts to meet its climate goals, said Ajay Mathur, Director-General, The Energy and Research Institute (TERI), one of India's key negotiators and spokesperson at the 2015 Paris climate summit. "There are a lot of Indian initiatives that have been undertaken to meet climate goals and none of these are based on climate financing. They are helping us to manage a balance between development and environmental concerns. This could have been accelerated with the help of climate finance," said Mathur speaking to DNA. The climate finance Mathur was referring to is the financial assistance developed economies are to provide developing countries under the Paris accord. Apart from finance, developed countries are to also provide support on capacity building and technology transfers. As part of its commitments, US had pledged $3 billion to the Green Climate Fund, an ...
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Trade rivals have limited armoury as U.S. quits climate deal 2.6.2017 Sify Finance
By Nina Chestney
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Paris or no Paris, India committed to protecting climate: PM Modi  2.6.2017 TOI: Home
India asserted that it is committed to protecting the climate irrespective of international deals or other countries' stand on it. "Paris or no Paris, our commitment to preserving the climate is for the sake of future generations," Prime Minister Modi said.
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US coal stocks fall; exit from climate deal may hurt, not help 2.6.2017 Sify Finance
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Paris Climate Deal: World leaders express regret over US’ withdrawal 2.6.2017 DNA: Wide Angle
United States President Donald Trump on Thursday said he would withdraw the United States from the landmark 2015 global agreement to fight climate change, drawing anger and condemnation from world leaders and heads of industry. Trump, tapping into the "America First" message he used when he was elected president last year, said the Paris accord would undermine the U.S. economy, cost U.S. jobs, weaken American national sovereignty and put the country at a permanent disadvantage to the other countries of the world. "We're getting out," Trump said at a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden under sunny skies on a warm June day, fulfilling a major election campaign pledge. "We don't want other leaders and other countries laughing at us anymore. And they won't be," Trump said. My job as President is to do everything within my power to give America a level playing field. #AmericaFirst — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 1, 2017 "The same nations asking us to stay in the agreement are the countries that ...
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World leaders voice dismay at Trump's climate deal pull out 2.6.2017 TOI: The United States
Supporters of the accord called Trump's move a blow to international efforts to curb the warming of the planet that threatens far-reaching consequences for this century and beyond. Former Democratic President Barack Obama expressed regret over the pullout from a deal he was instrumental in brokering.
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Trump pulls US out of  'partial to India, China' climate deal 2.6.2017 TOI: Home
The United States is going rogue on global warming. The country's 45th President, businessman entrepreneur Donald Trump, announced on Thursday that subject to a few caveats, Washington is pulling out of the widely-acclaimed climate change accord.
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US will withdraw from Paris climate accord: Donald Trump 2.6.2017 DNA: Money
President Donald Trump on Thursday said he will withdraw the United States from the landmark 2015 global agreement to fight climate change, spurning pleas from U.S. allies and corporate leaders in an action that fulfilled a major campaign pledge. "We're getting out," Trump said at a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden in which he decried the Paris accord's "draconian" financial and economic burdens. "In order to fulfill my solemn duty to protect America and its citizens, the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate accord," Trump said. But he added that the United States would begin negotiations to re-enter either the Paris accord or "a new transaction on terms that are fair to the United States, its businesses, its workers, its people, its taxpayers." With Trump's action, the United States will walk away from nearly every nation in the world on one of the pressing global issues of the 21st century. The pullout will align the United States with Syria and Nicaragua as the world's only ...
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