User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Global warming
Last updated: Aug 30 2016 03:55 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Study shows how climate can make you violent 25.6.2016 DNA: Urban Tales
Scientists have long struggled to explain why cool heads won't be able to prevail in a hotter world and now, a team of researchers has come up with a model that could help explain why. Developed by Paul van Lange of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam along with Maria I. Rinderu and Brad Bushman, this new model, called CLASH (CLimate Aggression, and Self-control in Humans), goes beyond the simple fact that hotter temperatures seem to be linked to more aggressive The researchers believe that hot climates and less variation in seasonal temperatures lead to a faster life strategy, less focus on the future, and less self-control - all of which contribute to more aggression and violence. "Climate shapes how people live, it affects the culture in ways that we don't think about in our daily lives," said lead author Van Lange. "We believe our model can help explain the impact of climate on rates of violence in different parts of the world." Many studies have shown that levels of violence and aggression are higher in ...
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Bridge of Hope concludes plantation drive to mark 'World Environment Day' 22.6.2016 Sify Finance
-NewsVoir): With an aim to make earth a better planet, believers Church's child care project Bridge of Hope concluded 15 Day sapling plantation drive across India.
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iCare announces 'Green Pentagon Award' for schools delivering best healthcare facilities 20.6.2016 Sify Finance
iCare, a leading organization working in the area of new-age child health care announced 'Green Pentagon Award' for schools delivering the best healthcare facilities with environment friendly
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Global Warming: John Kerry sees looming climate catastrophe after Arctic visit 19.6.2016 DNA: Top News
Standing near Greenland's Jakobshavn glacier, the reputed source of the iceberg that sank the Titanic over a century ago, U.S Secretary of State John Kerry saw evidence of another looming catastrophe. Giant icebergs broken off from the glacier seemed to groan as they drifted behind him, signaling eventual rising oceans that scientists warn will submerge islands and populated coastal region. Briefed by researchers aboard a Royal Danish Navy patrol ship, Kerry appeared stunned by how fast the ice sheets are melting. He was struck by the more dire warnings he heard about the same process underway in more remote Antarctica. "This has been a significant eye-opener for me and I've spent 25 years or more engaged in this issue," Kerry said on the deck of the ship with Danish Foreign Minister Kristian Jensen during a two-day visit that ended late on Friday. Icebergs that broke off from the Jakobshavn Glacier are seen in the water below an aircraft on July 14, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Kerry made his first ...
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Cheap global gas, coal prices won't deter investment into renewables: Energy report 14.6.2016 DNA: Wide Angle
Weak coal and gas prices will not stop record investment in renewables over the coming decades as the cost of generating clean energy drops, a key energy report said. Renewables are set to attract $7.8 trillion (nearly Rs 518.9 lakh crore) by 2040, nearly four times as much as carbon-based power over the same period, the New Energy Outlook 2016 forecast said. The impact of cheap gas and coal will be offset, it projected, by drops of 41 and 60%, respectively, in the price of power from wind and solar panels. Compared to a year ago, the report projects "significantly lower" coal and gas prices, said Jon Moore, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the research unit which conducted the study. "But, strikingly, (the report) still shows rapid transition towards clean power." The shift, however, to a low-carbon energy sector will not happen quickly enough to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), much less the more ambitious goal embraced by the world's nations last ...
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Global Warming: Melting Greenland ice linked to Arctic amplification 12.6.2016 DNA: Mumbai
Scientists have found the first evidence that links melting ice in Greenland to Arctic amplification - faster warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the Northern Hemisphere as sea ice disappears. The findings show that the predicted effects of Arctic amplification, as described in previous studies, occurred over northern Greenland during summer last year, including a northern swing of the jet stream that reached latitudes never before recorded in Greenland at that time of year. The Greenland ice sheet, Earth's second largest after Antarctica, holds enough ice that if it were to melt entirely, it would raise average global sea level by about 7 metres. Learning more about the drivers of melting is essential to discerning how much sea level will rise and by how much in the future and how Greenland's freshwater runoff will affect ocean circulation and ecology. "During the past two decades, we have seen increasing melt from the Greenland ice sheet, culminating in a very large melt event in the summer ...
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World Environment Day observed in State 7.6.2016 The Assam Tribune
World Environment Day observed in State
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Tea Board to come up with guidelines for tea processors for small tea growers 7.6.2016 ET: Agriculture
More than 200 STG representatives demanded concrete supportive measures from the government to set up their own manufacturing units.
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ISRO leads charge for space agency collaboration to prevent global warming 4.6.2016 DNA: Opinion
For the first time, under the impetus of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) and the French Space Agency (CNES), space agencies of more than 60 countries agreed to engage their satellites, to coordinate their methods and their data to monitor human-induced greenhouse gas emissions. The COP21 climate conference held in Paris last December acted as a wake-up call in this context. Without satellites, the reality of global warming would not have been recognised and the subsequent historic agreement at the United Nations headquarters in New York on April 22, 2016 would not have been signed. Out of the 50 essential climate variables being monitored today, 26 - including rising sea level, sea ice extent and greenhouse gas concentrations in all layers of the atmosphere - can be measured only from space. The key to effectively implementing the Paris Agreement lies in the ability to verify that nations are fulfilling their commitments to curb greenhouse gas emissions and only satellites can do ...
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World’s Space Agencies unite to face the Climate Challenge 4.6.2016 Govt of india: PIB
World’s Space Agencies unite to face the Climate Challenge
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Why Antarctica isn't facing global warming threats? 31.5.2016 Sify Finance
, May 31 (ANI): Guess why Antarctica is not melting down even after such drastic human-driven climate change.
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Pakistan should completely stop support to terror: PM to Wall Street Journal 27.5.2016 Rediff: Intl News
He said he has always maintained that instead of fighting with each other, India and Pakistan should together fight against poverty.
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As climate risks expand, diplomats start to overshadow environmental experts 26.5.2016 DNA: Popular News
Diplomats are gradually crowding out environment experts in global efforts to tackle climate change, a shift signalling a higher profile for the issue and improved chances for more coordination to fight it. Foreign ministries usually wield more clout in national governments than their environment colleagues and have more experience in coordinating issues as varied as politics, pollution, health, finance and diplomacy. The change is in the air these days at a May 16-26 United Nations (UN) meeting on implementing December 2015 Paris Agreement to limit global warming, negotiated at a high-level meeting hosted by France's then foreign minister Laurent Fabius. Last week, the United Nations chose Patricia Espinosa, a former Mexican foreign minister, as its climate chief from July. She has the highest-ranking diplomatic experience of anyone starting the job. "There has been a shift to understand that climate change is not only an environmental challenge, it's an economic, a social challenge and does require ...
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ExxonMobil tried to censor climate scientists to Congress during Bush era 25.5.2016 Guardian: Environment

Exclusive: 2001 intervention adds to evidence that oil company was aware of the science and its implications for government policy and the energy industry

ExxonMobil moved to squash a well-established congressional lecture series on climate science just nine days after the presidential inauguration of George W Bush, a former oil executive, the Guardian has learned.

Exxon’s intervention on the briefings, revealed here for the first time, adds to evidence the oil company was acutely aware of the state of climate science and its implications for government policy and the energy industry – despite Exxon’s public protestations for decades about the uncertainties of global warming science.

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Shell CEO warns renewables shift could spell end if too swift 24.5.2016 Sify Finance
By Ron Bousso
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Climate change likely to hit milk output 23.5.2016 TOI: Home
Dairy business provides livelihood to 60 million rural households in India and the country continues to be the largest producer of milk in the world, but global warming could result in adversely impacting the overall output in the coming years.
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Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate UN climate deal causes dismay abroad 18.5.2016 DNA: Opinion
Donald Trump's threat to renegotiate the global accord on climate change if elected US president caused dismay abroad on Wednesday, with many experts saying it was in his interests to embrace a deal seeking to end dependence on fossil fuels. US insistence on renegotiation could unravel a 195-nation compromise to curb greenhouse gas emissions reached in Paris in December after fraught talks between nations as different as China, the United States, small island states and OPEC members. "The Paris Agreement is as much in the United States' interests as any other country," said Tony de Brum, ambassador for climate change of the Marshall Islands who, as his country's foreign minister, helped broker the UN deal. "Seeking to unravel it would not only threaten the US economy, damage its environment, and weaken its security, but it would do a great disservice to all of humanity," he said. Republican presidential contender Trump told Reuters on Tuesday he was "not a big fan" of the climate accord and said that ...
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Global warming will hit poorer countries hardest, research finds 17.5.2016 The Guardian -- World Latest

Tropical regions likely to suffer biggest increase in hot days and extreme weather because of climate change, say scientists

New evidence that poorer countries will suffer the worst effects of climate change has shown that the number of hot days in tropical developing countries is likely to increase markedly as global warming takes hold.

It has long been expected that poor people would bear the brunt of climate change, largely because so many more of the world’s poorest live in tropical latitudes whereas, wealthier people tend to live in more temperate regions.

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Climate change puts 1.3bn people and $158tn at risk, says World Bank 17.5.2016 The Guardian -- Front Page

Organisation urges better city planning and defensive measures to defend against rapid rise in climate change-linked disasters

The global community is badly prepared for a rapid increase in climate change-related natural disasters that by 2050 will put 1.3 billion people at risk, according to the World Bank.

Urging better planning of cities before it was too late, a report published on Monday from a Bank-run body that focuses on disaster mitigation, said assets worth $158tn – double the total annual output of the global economy – would be in jeopardy by 2050 without preventative action.

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Dairy provides livelihood to 60 million farmers in India Shri Radha Mohan Singh 16.5.2016 Govt of india: PIB
Dairy provides livelihood to 60 million farmers in India Shri Radha Mohan Singh
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