User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: India Specific
Last updated: Jul 07 2015 23:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
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Corrected - New U.N. development goals will drive nations "nuts" - Indian economist 7.7.2015 Sify Finance
(Corrects number of members in paragraph 8)
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New U.N. development goals will drive nations "nuts" - Indian economist 7.7.2015 Sify Finance
NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - An Indian economist and member of a key government panel which formulates policy on social issues slammed the United Nations' new development goals on
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CORRECTED- New UN development goals will drive nations "nuts"-Indian economist 7.7.2015 Sify News
(Corrects number of members in paragraph 8)
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New U.N. development goals will drive nations "nuts"-Indian economist 7.7.2015 Sify News
NEW DELHI, July 7 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - An Indian economist and member of a key government panel which formulates policy on social issues slammed the United Nations' new development goals
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India is now world's fastest-growing major polluter 7.7.2015 Sify Finance
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Major polluter pledges not enough to meet emissions targets, says report 7.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

New Climate Economy study recommends actions at local level could bridge huge gap of between two-thirds and 96% of extra carbon cuts needed to avoid dangerous global warming

A landmark climate change conference in Paris this December has triggered commitments on carbon emissions curbs from most of the world’s major polluters – but those pledges will still not be enough to bring about the reductions scientists say are necessary.

A new report published on Tuesday shows that the remainder of the needed reductions in carbon can be found if actions are taken at a local level, deforestation is halted, and other greenhouse gases are tackled.

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Monsoon delay: Winged visitors may give Coimbatore a miss 7.7.2015 TOI: Cities
Bird watchers and researchers fear the delayed monsoon may turn away the avians which usually visit the district between July and ...
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Children gather to maintain garden 6.7.2015 Hubli - City - The Times of India
A group of children in Hubballi have shown that the future of the world is in safe hands, and if their counterparts across the globe emulate them, one need not have to worry about ecological threats like global warming.
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Heat-related deaths will double in urban India by 2080: IIM 6.7.2015 DNA: Top News
Heat-related mortalities will witness a two-fold increase in urban areas of India by 2080, a study done by the Indian Institute of Management-Ahmedabad (IIM-A) predicts. The IIM study titled as 'Predicted increase in heat- related mortality under climate change in urban India' also asked the Indian policy-makers to plan and respond to the challenge of climate change in the country, which recorded more than 2000 deaths in summer this year. "Urban areas in India are projected to witness two-fold or more increase in heat-related mortality under the projected future climate," the study conducted by IIM-A researcher Amit Garg, Vimal Mishra of Indian Institute of Gandhinagar and a member of Delhi-based NGO Council for Energy, Environment and Water, Hem Dholakia said. The study, which is based on data collected from 52 Urban centres, said the mortality is projected to increase 71 to 140 per cent in the late 21st century. "We find that increase in heat-related mortality will overshadow decline in the ...
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My name is Red  6.7.2015 Telegraph: Calcutta
Reverence, the annual day of DPS Ruby Park, was a mix of dance, drama and music. The programme started with the school choir comprising 200 students singing Yeh dharti hum sabki hai pyaari. This was followed by the 120-member school orchestra putting up a great performance. The students presented a dance drama, My Dream India — An Awakening, about global issues such as terrorism, environmental pollution and global warming. The musical act featured various dance forms such as Sufi, Chhau, Kalaripayattu and ballet. Principal Anusree Ghose welcomed the parents and took the opportunity to thank them for their “faith and support”. “It has helped us achieve our goals and dreams,” she said. The students too were an excited lot. “I am performing to Miley sur mera tumhara. My mom’s here and I can’t wait to know how she liked it,” said Portia Raychowdhury, Class IX. Picture by Arnab Mondal
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Vanamahotsava observed in Manipur 5.7.2015 The Assam Tribune
Vanamahotsava observed in Manipur
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India's climate pledge 'critically important', says UN climate chief 3.7.2015 Guardian: Environment

Christiana Figueres says Delhi’s promise of ambitious cuts and plans to help 400m energy poor will be vital to getting a binding deal in Paris

A strong pledge to curb carbon emissions by India, the world’s third largest polluter, will be “critically important” to a meaningful deal at the crucial UN climate summit in Paris in December, the UN’s climate chief has said.

India has so far resisted calls for an ambitious target, citing the millions in the country who do not have access to energy and the need to pull those people out of poverty. Instead, it has suggested that it may make two climate pledges: one that can be achieved with domestic resources, and another that would be possible with financial and technological aid from the developed world.

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Cycle of good monsoons may return in five to ten years 3.7.2015 ET: Indicators
DS Pai, head of Long Range Forecasting (LRF) division of the IMD did a study of 31 year moving average of the seasonal monsoon rainfall, from 1905 onwards.
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Jairam Ramesh: India can't remain on the path of further destruction 2.7.2015 Guardian: Environment
Former environment minister believes the cult of unfettered economic growth has been ruinous for India’s environment, reports Yale Environment 360 Jairam Ramesh was a self-described “economic hawk” when he became India’s environment minister in 2009, figuring that the country’s ecological problems could wait as India lifted its people out of poverty. But by the time he left his post in 2011 , he had become an environmental hawk after witnessing how India’s rapidly expanding economy and soaring population had caused widespread pollution and destruction of the environment. Today, Ramesh is one of the most outspoken critics of India’s environmental policy under prime minister Narendra Modi, who, despite his support of major investments in renewable energy, is otherwise widely criticized by conservationists for putting economic growth ahead of environmental preservation. This balance between economic growth and environmental protection is a core theme in Ramesh’s recently published book, Green Signals — ...
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Making sense of Miami: what America's refuge city says about the US's future 2.7.2015 The Guardian -- World Latest
The dizzying blend of accents entices some visitors and alarms others. But as the US gets ever-closer to Cuba, long-time Miami resident Michael Deibert asks: what can the rest of America learn from its own multicultural metropolis? Just off Miami’s busy Calle Ocho, the thoroughfare that is the beating cultural heart of the city’s Cuban community, there rises a splendid ceiba tree whose roots erupt from the ground like waves from the sea, and whose vast branches throw shade far to either side. All around the gnarled roots and tucked into the tree’s hidden crevices, one finds the offerings of the faithful: candles, bags of food, feathers, bones. In this modern metropolis, whose vaulting skyscrapers a mile away reflect the near-blinding sun, the saturnalia surrounding the ceiba attests to the lifeblood of the Afro-Cuban religion of santería, and Miami’s eternal place in the imagination of el exilio, as the Cuban community is often referred ...
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Zoological Survey of India monitoring climate change impact on Sundarban animals 2.7.2015 DNA: Wide Angle
To measure the effect of climate change on the flora and fauna of Sundarbans, the Zoological Survey of India has set up monitoring bases inside the mangrove forests. There are 25 plots in the five islands of Bali, Gosaba, Basanti, Sagar and Satjelia where the bases have been set up to measure the diversity and population index of mangroves, crabs and snails. "Any change in their population will reveal how climate change is affecting the islands. We will know to what extent the biodiversity is getting affected due to change in the water salinity level and other factors," project in-charge scientist Bulganin Mitra told PTI. The monitoring process is an ongoing one and experts are sent to the spot to collect data about their population and species. "We will also take photographs and prepare a GPS map of their habitat. We will prepare a baseline data of biodiversity. As time passes by we will be able to know whether there is any change in the flora and fauna of the region or not," he said. The monitoring ...
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Green, the new watchword in pink state 2.7.2015 TOI: Cities
Telangana Haritha Haaram (THH), which is touted to be the world's third largest green drive, is likely to bring down the annual mean temperature in the nascent Telugu state by about three degrees Celsius over the next 10 ...
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UN issues first-ever guidance to combat heatwaves 1.7.2015 TOI: The United States
For the first time, the United Nations today issued a new joint guidance for countries to address the health risks posed by heatwaves that have become more frequent and deadlier over the last 50 years, recently killing over 3,000 people in India and ...
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Air pollution: India, China worst sufferers 1.7.2015 Rediff: Business
The industrialised world must work fast.
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India is now world's fastest-growing major polluter 1.7.2015 Rediff: Business
It is in coal consumption that India most diverges from the rest of the world
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