User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Species
Last updated: Sep 18 2019 11:43 IST RSS 2.0
 
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World Forestry Day observed at Kaziranga 25.3.2018 The Assam Tribune
World Forestry Day observed at Kaziranga
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Sydney goes dark as global Earth Hour climate campaign kicks off 24.3.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge went dark for an hour today to kick off a global campaign raising awareness about the impacts of climate change. Earth Hour, which started in Australia in 2007, is set to be observed by millions of supporters in 187 countries, who will turn off their lights at 8.30pm local time in what organisers describe as the world's "largest grassroots movement for climate change". "It aims to raise awareness about the importance of protecting the environment and wildlife," Earth Hour organiser WWF Australia chief Dermot O'Gorman told AFP. Other global landmarks that will take part include Beijing's Bird's Nest Olympic stadium, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Pyramids of Egypt and New York's Empire State Building. With global temperatures the highest on record, O'Gorman said this year's theme was the impact of climate change on biodiversity and plant and animal species. "More than half of plant and animal species face local extinction in some of the world's most naturally rich ...
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Dr Harsh Vardhan Lays Foundation Stone for Redevelopment And Upgardation of Okhla Bird Sanctuary 22.3.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Urging people to make a collective effort to protect the environment, flora and fauna, Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that environmental issues are not technical issues, but moral issues.
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1.5 million penguins discovered on remote Antarctic islands 4.3.2018 DNA: India
A thriving "hotspot" of 1.5 million Adelie penguins, a species fast declining in parts of the world, has been discovered on remote islands off the Antarctic Peninsula, surprised scientists said. The first bird census of the Danger Islands unearthed over 750,000 Adelie breeding pairs, more than the rest of the area combined, the team reported in the journal Scientific Reports.  The group of nine rocky islands, which lie off the northern tip nearest South America, in the northwest Weddell Sea, housed the third- and fourth-largest Adelie penguin colonies in the world, they found. "It is certainly surprising and it has real consequences for how we manage this region," study co-author Heather Lynch of Stony Brook University told AFP. Just 160 kilometres (100 miles) away on the west of the peninsula - a thin limb jutting out of West Antarctica - Adelie numbers have dropped about 70 per cent in recent decades due to sea ice melt blamed on global warming. "One of the ways in which this is good news is that other ...
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Floriculture to boost rural economy: Sikkim Minister 19.2.2018 The Assam Tribune
Floriculture to boost rural economy: Sikkim Minister
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MoU Signed between Botanical Survey of India and Natural History Museum, UK 17.2.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Botanical Survey of India (BSI) and Natural History Museum (NHM), UK signed a Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation in the field of genetic/taxonomic studies, research and training, conservation in India, including species and habitat conservation assessments, etc here today.
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All-India Tiger Estimation 2018 to be Hi-Tech, More Accurate and Precise 6.2.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The All-India Tiger Estimation, 2018 exercise promises not just to be hi-tech, but will also be far more accurate and precise than ever before. In an interactive session with mediapersons here today, officers from National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and scientists from Wildlife Institute of India explained how the current assessment uses Android phone-based application and desktop version of M-STrIPES (Monitoring System for Tigers-Intensive Protection and Ecological Status) for collecting, archiving and analyzing data.
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Polar bears go hungry as the Arctic ice melts: Study 2.2.2018 DNA: Mumbai
A study of polar bear metabolism conducted near Alaska's Prudhoe Bay has provided more reason to worry about the future of these massive predators that prowl the Arctic. Scientists said on Thursday they examined activity levels, foraging behavior and blood biochemistry of a group of polar bears during their prime hunting season on the sea ice of the Beaufort Sea, determining that the metabolism of the species is about 60 percent greater than previously understood. The decline of Arctic sea ice amid global climate change is making polar bears travel farther to find prey such as ringed seals. The findings have scientists worried about whether polar bears will be able to catch enough prey to meet their unexpectedly high energy needs and sustain their population. Nine female polar bears were fitted for eight to 11 days in April of 2014, 2015 and 2016 with high-tech collars that provided satellite tracking of their movements and captured video to observe behavior and hunting success, U.S. Geological Survey ...
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Bid to develop climate change-resilient muga silkworm breed 24.1.2018 The Assam Tribune
Bid to develop climate change-resilient muga silkworm breed
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Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas 16.1.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
Australia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef is reeling from significant coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change. The 2,300-km site is also under pressure from farming runoff, development and predatory crown-of-thorns starfish, with experts warning it could be suffering irreparable damage. Today, the Australian government announced a USD 1.6 million funding pot available to people with bright ideas on how to save the reef. "The scale of the problem is big and big thinking is needed, but it's important to remember that solutions can come from anywhere," said Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg. He said the money would be available to the world's "greatest scientific minds, industry and business leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs". "Solutions could focus on anything from ...
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Scientists say there's a limit to the human lifespan – and we’ve already hit it 7.12.2017 DNA: Top News
Humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, according to a first-of-its-kind research that looked at 120 years worth of historical information. Scientists suggest that humans have biological limitations, and that anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - could have a deleterious effect on these limits. Despite stories that with each generation we will live longer and longer, this review suggests there may be a maximum threshold to our biological limits that we cannot exceed. Researchers studied trends emerging from historical records, concluding that there appears to be a plateau in the maximum biological limits for humans' height, age and physical abilities. "These traits no longer increase, despite further continuous nutritional, medical, and scientific progress. This suggests that modern societies have allowed our species to reach its limits. We are the first generation to become aware of this," said Jean-Francois Toussaint ...
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‘India Awarded Certificate of Commendation for Its Effort to Combat Illegal Wildlife Trade”: Dr Harsh Vardhan 1.12.2017 Govt of india: PIB
Union Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that India has been awarded with the Certificate of Commendation for its exemplary enforcement action in its regional and global effort to combat illegal wildlife trade.
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Freshwater fishes in North East facing threats 28.9.2017 The Assam Tribune
Freshwater fishes in North East facing threats
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Meet the new spider species named after Barack Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio and Bernie Sanders 27.9.2017 DNA: Top News
Scientists have discovered 15 new species of "smiley-faced" spiders and named them after David Attenborough, Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Bernie Sanders among others. In a study published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers detailed the new spider species named Spintharus davidattenboroughi, S barackobamai, S michelleobamaae, and S berniesandersi as well as S davidbowiei and S leonardodicaprioi. "In naming these spiders, the students and I wanted to honor people who stood up for both human rights and warned about climate change - leaders and artists who promoted sensible approaches for a better world," said Ingi Agnarsson, professor at University of Vermont in the US. Until now, the yellow, smiley-faced spiders in the genus Spintharus - named for a smiley face pattern on their abdomens - have been thought to have one widespread species "from northern North America down to northern Brazil," Agnarsson said. However, when researchers examined spiders from ...
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“Law of the land must be upheld, as many species are on the verge of extinction”: Dr. Harsh Vardhan 22.9.2017 Govt of india: PIB
Emphasising the need for spreading awareness and sensitization on crimes against wildlife, Union Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that the law of the land must be upheld, since many species are on the verge of extinction.
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Environment Minister inaugurates training workshop on capacity building of Indian Zoo Veterinarians on Animal Health Management in Captivity 11.9.2017 Govt of india: PIB
Appreciating the difficulties faced by the Zoo Veterinarians in the diagnosis of diseases and treatment of the wild animals kept in captivity, Union Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that advancements such as C.A.T scan and M.R.I must be used for the benefit of animals.
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NTCA opposes plan to subsume under bigger wildlife body 11.9.2017 DNA: Wide Angle
The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) has strongly opposed a proposal to subsume itself and its flagship Project Tiger scheme under the ambit of an overarching National Wildlife Conservation Authority (NWCA) aimed at conservation of the habitats of all animals. An evaluation committee of the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEF&CC) had recommended the idea of NWCA last year in a report on the performance of 12 Plan schemes. Following NTCA's opposition to the proposal, the ministry has currently shelved the plan, top officials said. Following a review of NTCA's fund allocation, habitat and conservation issues, the ministry's evaluation committee, headed by senior economic adviser Anandi Subramanian, had recommended that NTCA should be renamed NWCA to widen its scope and include all wildlife and habitat conservation schemes under it. "Such convergence will avoid pitfalls associated with the current delineation of activities under each scheme," the evaluation committee had ...
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English rendering of PMs Speech at International Agro Biodiversity Congress 2016 6.9.2017 Govt of india: PIB
The eminent personalities on the stage, Ladies and gentlemen, I am extremely delighted to be present among the great scientists, educationalists, policy-makers working on Agro-biodiversity and my farmer brothers. I welcome the delegates from different countries to this historic town. For the first time such an event on a crucial topic like Agro- biodiversity has been organised at the international level.
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Environment Minister launches ‘Gaj Yatra’ to mark World Elephant Day 2017 12.8.2017 Govt of india: PIB
Union Environment, Forest and Climate Change Minister, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, launched ‘Gaj Yatra’ here today, a nationwide campaign to protect elephants on the occasion of World Elephant Day.
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Humans may have evolved just by chance: Study 6.8.2017 DNA: India
Mere chance may have caused humans to evolve into smarter, more advanced beings than our ancestors, according to a study which refutes the theory that our race originated in response to climate change. Many scientists have argued that an influx, described as a "pulse," of new animal species appear in the African fossil record between 2.8 and 2.5 million years ago, including our own genus Homo. Experts believe it takes a broad-scale event like global climate change to spark the origination of so many diverse new species. However, W Andrew Barr from George Washington University in the US said that it is possible the pulse of new species could have occurred by chance and might not be directly related to climate change. It is generally accepted that when major environmental changes occur, some species will go extinct and others will originate, which can create a cluster or pulse of new species in the fossil record. However, there is no set definition of what is considered a pulse, so experts have disagreed ...
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