User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Species
Last updated: May 22 2020 11:19 IST RSS 2.0
 
41 to 60 of 1,736    
'Seals helping predict Antarctic ice sheet melt' 17.5.2018 DNA: Popular News
Seals found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists to make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the ice sheet is melting. Scientists tagged two seal species with devices to collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica, according to the findings published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The team at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK has been investigating ways of studying warm, salty, deep water in the Amundsen Sea, in the Southern Ocean. Understanding more about how this water gets towards the ice shelves by measuring its temperature, salinity and depth, will help climate change modellers make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the Antarctic ice sheet is melting, they said. As the ice in west Antarctica melts, it has been estimated that sea levels could rise by up to 3.2 metres, with much of the water draining through two glaciers - Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier - in the Amundsen ...
Also found in: [+]
“Botanic Garden will be Developed as one of the Most Distinct Gardens with Modern-Day Landscape”: Dr. Harsh Vardhan 13.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that the Botanic Garden of Indian Republic (BGIR) Noida, will be developed as one of the most distinct botanic gardens with modern-day landscape.
Also found in: [+]
Warming Antarctic risks diet of Emperor Penguins 5.5.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The most beautiful birds in Antartic, Emperor Penguins eat a variety of fish but diminishing sea ice in the warming Antarctic means less fish to eat. The tallest and heaviest of all living penguin species, Emperor Penguin, have a varied menu that changes with the season. Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have developed a way to help determine the foraging success of Emperor penguins. Off all the penguin species, Emperor penguins tend to be the biggest eaters. And for good reason: they make exceptionally long treks on sea ice to reach their foraging grounds and feed their large chicks when they return. But as sea ice diminishes, so does the microscopic plankton living underneath, which serves as the primary food source for fish that penguins eat. Sea ice also provides an important resting platform for the penguins in between foraging dives, so melting can make foraging that much harder. "Global warming may be cutting in on food availability for Emperor penguins," said Dan ...
Also found in: [+]
Study links global warming with huge algae patches in Arabian Sea, fish mortalities 3.5.2018 DNA: Popular News
Global warming is resulting in massive patches of an algae species in the Arabian Sea that is eating up the planktons and excreting large amounts of ammonia leading to fish mortalities, a joint study conducted by institutes of India and the US has found. The Noctiluca Algae is often reported to occur in patches and blooms in the Northern Arabian Sea. The study also denies any link between the growth of the algae to low oxygen and coastal pollution from major Indian cities along the west coast. These algae patches -- some as big as one-fourth the size of Mumbai -- are observed in the sea north off Mumbai and stretch as far as the Oman coast. The striking green blooms often appear to glow at night due to a special phenomenon called bioluminescence, earning them the nickname "sea sparkle". "Unfortunately, these beautiful patches, indicate zones of decline because fish cannot thrive and sometimes die because of these blooms. Noctiluca voraciously eats one of the most important planktonic organisms at the ...
Also found in: [+]
Just like his 'Titanic' co-star Kate Winslet, Leonardo DiCaprio too has a beetle named after him 1.5.2018 DNA: Evolutions
Grouvellinus leonardodicaprioi was discovered at a waterfall in the remote Maliau Basin in Malaysian Borneo.
Also found in: [+]
Jesus Christ's 'crown of thorns' may help fight climate change: Israeli scientists 29.3.2018 DNA: Top News
As the sun beats down on the barren slopes around Jerusalem, a tree of the kind believed to have provided the crown of thorns in Biblical accounts of Jesus Christ's crucifixion stands unaffected, its fruits ample and foliage green. While pilgrims prepare to converge on the city at Easter to commemorate the events of Christian tradition, Israeli scientists researching climate change are at work in the surrounding hills studying the Ziziphus Spina-Christi, commonly known as Christ's Thorn Jujube. They believe it is a "pioneer species" in the fight against desertification because its hardiness makes it resilient to rising temperatures and aridity. It can draw water from deep underground, and it retains the ability to photosynthesise even when exposed to high temperatures and solar radiation. "It's one of the few species that we can plant on these slopes that have nothing on them," said Shabtai Cohen of Israel's Volcani Agricultural Research Centre, who has been working with France's National Institute for ...
Also found in: [+]
Ultra-thin sun shield could protect Great Barrier Reef: Here's how 27.3.2018 DNA: Recent Columns
An ultra-fine biodegradable film some 50,000 times thinner than a human hair could be enlisted to protect the Great Barrier Reef from environmental degradation, researchers said. The World Heritage-listed site, which attracts millions of tourists each year, is reeling from significant bouts of coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change. Scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Biology have been buoyed by test results of a floating "sun shield" made of calcium carbonate that has been shown to protect the reef from the effects of bleaching. "It's designed to sit on the surface of the water above the corals, rather than directly on the corals, to provide an effective barrier against the sun," Great Barrier Reef Foundation managing director Anna Marsden said. The trials, headed by the scientist who developed the country's polymer bank notes, on seven different coral types found that the protective layer decreased bleaching of most species, cutting off sunlight by up to ...
Also found in: [+]
World Forestry Day observed at Kaziranga 25.3.2018 The Assam Tribune
World Forestry Day observed at Kaziranga
Also found in: [+]
Sydney goes dark as global Earth Hour climate campaign kicks off 24.3.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge went dark for an hour today to kick off a global campaign raising awareness about the impacts of climate change. Earth Hour, which started in Australia in 2007, is set to be observed by millions of supporters in 187 countries, who will turn off their lights at 8.30pm local time in what organisers describe as the world's "largest grassroots movement for climate change". "It aims to raise awareness about the importance of protecting the environment and wildlife," Earth Hour organiser WWF Australia chief Dermot O'Gorman told AFP. Other global landmarks that will take part include Beijing's Bird's Nest Olympic stadium, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the Pyramids of Egypt and New York's Empire State Building. With global temperatures the highest on record, O'Gorman said this year's theme was the impact of climate change on biodiversity and plant and animal species. "More than half of plant and animal species face local extinction in some of the world's most naturally rich ...
Also found in: [+]
Dr Harsh Vardhan Lays Foundation Stone for Redevelopment And Upgardation of Okhla Bird Sanctuary 22.3.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Urging people to make a collective effort to protect the environment, flora and fauna, Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that environmental issues are not technical issues, but moral issues.
Also found in: [+]
1.5 million penguins discovered on remote Antarctic islands 4.3.2018 DNA: India
A thriving "hotspot" of 1.5 million Adelie penguins, a species fast declining in parts of the world, has been discovered on remote islands off the Antarctic Peninsula, surprised scientists said. The first bird census of the Danger Islands unearthed over 750,000 Adelie breeding pairs, more than the rest of the area combined, the team reported in the journal Scientific Reports.  The group of nine rocky islands, which lie off the northern tip nearest South America, in the northwest Weddell Sea, housed the third- and fourth-largest Adelie penguin colonies in the world, they found. "It is certainly surprising and it has real consequences for how we manage this region," study co-author Heather Lynch of Stony Brook University told AFP. Just 160 kilometres (100 miles) away on the west of the peninsula - a thin limb jutting out of West Antarctica - Adelie numbers have dropped about 70 per cent in recent decades due to sea ice melt blamed on global warming. "One of the ways in which this is good news is that other ...
Also found in: [+]
Floriculture to boost rural economy: Sikkim Minister 19.2.2018 The Assam Tribune
Floriculture to boost rural economy: Sikkim Minister
Also found in: [+]
MoU Signed between Botanical Survey of India and Natural History Museum, UK 17.2.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Botanical Survey of India (BSI) and Natural History Museum (NHM), UK signed a Memorandum of Understanding for cooperation in the field of genetic/taxonomic studies, research and training, conservation in India, including species and habitat conservation assessments, etc here today.
Also found in: [+]
All-India Tiger Estimation 2018 to be Hi-Tech, More Accurate and Precise 6.2.2018 Govt of india: PIB
The All-India Tiger Estimation, 2018 exercise promises not just to be hi-tech, but will also be far more accurate and precise than ever before. In an interactive session with mediapersons here today, officers from National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and scientists from Wildlife Institute of India explained how the current assessment uses Android phone-based application and desktop version of M-STrIPES (Monitoring System for Tigers-Intensive Protection and Ecological Status) for collecting, archiving and analyzing data.
Also found in: [+]
Polar bears go hungry as the Arctic ice melts: Study 2.2.2018 DNA: Mumbai
A study of polar bear metabolism conducted near Alaska's Prudhoe Bay has provided more reason to worry about the future of these massive predators that prowl the Arctic. Scientists said on Thursday they examined activity levels, foraging behavior and blood biochemistry of a group of polar bears during their prime hunting season on the sea ice of the Beaufort Sea, determining that the metabolism of the species is about 60 percent greater than previously understood. The decline of Arctic sea ice amid global climate change is making polar bears travel farther to find prey such as ringed seals. The findings have scientists worried about whether polar bears will be able to catch enough prey to meet their unexpectedly high energy needs and sustain their population. Nine female polar bears were fitted for eight to 11 days in April of 2014, 2015 and 2016 with high-tech collars that provided satellite tracking of their movements and captured video to observe behavior and hunting success, U.S. Geological Survey ...
Also found in: [+]
Bid to develop climate change-resilient muga silkworm breed 24.1.2018 The Assam Tribune
Bid to develop climate change-resilient muga silkworm breed
Also found in: [+]
Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideas 16.1.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
Australia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure. The UNESCO World Heritage-listed reef is reeling from significant coral bleaching due to warming sea temperatures linked to climate change. The 2,300-km site is also under pressure from farming runoff, development and predatory crown-of-thorns starfish, with experts warning it could be suffering irreparable damage. Today, the Australian government announced a USD 1.6 million funding pot available to people with bright ideas on how to save the reef. "The scale of the problem is big and big thinking is needed, but it's important to remember that solutions can come from anywhere," said Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg. He said the money would be available to the world's "greatest scientific minds, industry and business leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs". "Solutions could focus on anything from ...
Also found in: [+]
Scientists say there's a limit to the human lifespan – and we’ve already hit it 7.12.2017 DNA: Top News
Humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, according to a first-of-its-kind research that looked at 120 years worth of historical information. Scientists suggest that humans have biological limitations, and that anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - could have a deleterious effect on these limits. Despite stories that with each generation we will live longer and longer, this review suggests there may be a maximum threshold to our biological limits that we cannot exceed. Researchers studied trends emerging from historical records, concluding that there appears to be a plateau in the maximum biological limits for humans' height, age and physical abilities. "These traits no longer increase, despite further continuous nutritional, medical, and scientific progress. This suggests that modern societies have allowed our species to reach its limits. We are the first generation to become aware of this," said Jean-Francois Toussaint ...
Also found in: [+]
‘India Awarded Certificate of Commendation for Its Effort to Combat Illegal Wildlife Trade”: Dr Harsh Vardhan 1.12.2017 Govt of india: PIB
Union Minister of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that India has been awarded with the Certificate of Commendation for its exemplary enforcement action in its regional and global effort to combat illegal wildlife trade.
Also found in: [+]
Freshwater fishes in North East facing threats 28.9.2017 The Assam Tribune
Freshwater fishes in North East facing threats
Also found in: [+]
41 to 60 of 1,736