User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Species
Last updated: Oct 08 2018 16:56 IST RSS 2.0
 
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“Relationship with environment must be based on cooperation”: Dr. Mahesh Sharma 8.10.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Urging children to play a leading role in the protection of wildlife and environment, Minister of State of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Mahesh Sharma, has said that our relationship with environment must be based on cooperation.
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Aaranyak-IITG MoU on common interests 6.9.2018 The Assam Tribune
Aaranyak-IITG MoU on common interests
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Wheat genome unravelled: can help in dealing with climate change 31.8.2018 Sify Finance
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Beekeeping training concludes at Nalbari 13.8.2018 The Assam Tribune
Beekeeping training concludes at Nalbari
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“Need to Address Root Cause Behind Man-Animal Conflict”: Suresh Prabhu 12.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Strongly emphasizing the need to address the root cause behind the man-animal conflict, Union Minister for Commerce & Industry, Mr. Suresh Prabhu pointed out that the man-animal conflict is an existential crisis not for the animals, but for human beings.
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Native Tree Species 3.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Minister of State for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr.  Mahesh Sharma has said that all the field officials of the Forest Department including Indian Forest Service Officers, Assistant Conservator of Forests, Forest Range Officers, Deputy Range Officers and Forest Guards are trained in forestry and tree Plantation.
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Nagaland home to 2,431 plant species, says Minister 22.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Nagaland home to 2,431 plant species, says Minister
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Census on Peacocks 20.7.2018 Govt of india: PIB
“Peacocks are commonly found birds, both inside forest areas as well as in agricultural or human habitations. Management and protection of wildlife, including birds is the responsibility of the concerned Stare/Union Territory Governments.
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Deep reefs won't be 'twilight zone' refuge for fish, corals: Study 20.7.2018 DNA: Money
Deep coral reefs in a "twilight zone" in the oceans differ sharply from those near the surface, dimming hopes that they can be a refuge for marine life fleeing threats such as climate change and pollution, scientists said on Thursday. Worldwide, coral reefs in shallow waters are among ecosystems most threatened by climate change. The Great Barrier Reef off Australia suffered severe bleaching, a whitening driven by warm waters that can kill corals, in 2016 and 2017. A U.S.-led team of divers who studied little-known reefs in the West Atlantic and Pacific Oceans between 30 and 150 metres (100-500 ft) deep where sunlight fades, found most species of corals and fish were unlike those closer to the surface. "We were surprised to find little overlap," lead author Luiz Rocha of the California Academy of Sciences told Reuters of the findings published in the journal science. Less than five percent of fish and corals were found in both shallow and deep waters against the scientists' previous estimate of 60-75 ...
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Earth may get twice as hot as predicted 10.7.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Earth may end up being twice as warm as projected by climate models, even if the world meets the target of limiting global warming to under two degrees Celsius, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that sea levels may rise six metres or more even if Paris climate goals are met. The findings are based on observational evidence from three warm periods over the past 3.5 million years when the world was 0.5-2 degree Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial temperatures of the 19th Century. The research also revealed how large areas of the polar ice caps could collapse and significant changes to ecosystems could see the Sahara Desert become green and the edges of tropical forests turn into fire dominated savanna. "Observations of past warming periods suggest that a number of amplifying mechanisms, which are poorly represented in climate models, increase long-term warming beyond  climate model projections," said Hubertus Fischer from the University of Bern in ...
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State govt yet to comply with recommendations 23.6.2018 The Assam Tribune
State govt yet to comply with recommendations
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Ancient Greenland was much warmer than thought 5.6.2018 DNA: Evolutions
Greenland was once much warmer than previously thought, say scientists who have discovered remains of ancient life in lake mud of the region that survived the last ice age. The mud, discovered by researchers at the Northwestern University in the US, has remains of common flies nestled within it, which record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods - the early Holocene and Last Interglacial - experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in the Earth's orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland was even warmer than previously thought.
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Pygmy hog conservation receives a shot in the arm 4.6.2018 The Assam Tribune
Pygmy hog conservation receives a shot in the arm
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Environment Ministry, Teri Sign MOU to Set up a Resource Efficiency Cell; 2.6.2018 Govt of india: PIB
In the run up to World Environment Day, Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change and The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) today launched a number of initiatives to support the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) focus on waste management and resource efficiency.
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Decoded: Impact of climate change on river ecosystems 22.5.2018 DNA: Wide Angle
According to a recent study, climate change can impact fragile river ecosystems all over the world. Research undertaken in South Africa's Kruger National Park (KNP) has shown that increasing frequency of cyclone-driven extreme floods is responsible for destroying some of the world's most sensitive and valuable riverine habitats. Researchers from the universities of Hull, Aberystwyth, and Salford and the engineering consultants "Architecture, Engineering, Consulting, Operations, and Maintenance" (AECOM), used laser survey technology (LiDAR) flown from an aircraft, to measure the impacts of cyclone-driven extreme floods in 2000 and 2012 on rivers in KNP. KNP game reserve has global significance for its habitats and associated species, and the rivers flowing through the park provide essential ecosystem services, including water and habitat in the shape of the many varied channel morphologies and associated riparian forest. The high-resolution data has been used to create accurate digital models of the river ...
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'Seals helping predict Antarctic ice sheet melt' 17.5.2018 DNA: Popular News
Seals found in Antarctic seas are helping scientists to make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the ice sheet is melting. Scientists tagged two seal species with devices to collect data about the temperature and salinity of waters around vulnerable ice sheets in West Antarctica, according to the findings published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The team at the University of East Anglia (UEA) in the UK has been investigating ways of studying warm, salty, deep water in the Amundsen Sea, in the Southern Ocean. Understanding more about how this water gets towards the ice shelves by measuring its temperature, salinity and depth, will help climate change modellers make more accurate predictions about how rapidly the Antarctic ice sheet is melting, they said. As the ice in west Antarctica melts, it has been estimated that sea levels could rise by up to 3.2 metres, with much of the water draining through two glaciers - Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier - in the Amundsen ...
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“Botanic Garden will be Developed as one of the Most Distinct Gardens with Modern-Day Landscape”: Dr. Harsh Vardhan 13.5.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Union Minister for Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Dr. Harsh Vardhan has said that the Botanic Garden of Indian Republic (BGIR) Noida, will be developed as one of the most distinct botanic gardens with modern-day landscape.
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Warming Antarctic risks diet of Emperor Penguins 5.5.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The most beautiful birds in Antartic, Emperor Penguins eat a variety of fish but diminishing sea ice in the warming Antarctic means less fish to eat. The tallest and heaviest of all living penguin species, Emperor Penguin, have a varied menu that changes with the season. Researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) have developed a way to help determine the foraging success of Emperor penguins. Off all the penguin species, Emperor penguins tend to be the biggest eaters. And for good reason: they make exceptionally long treks on sea ice to reach their foraging grounds and feed their large chicks when they return. But as sea ice diminishes, so does the microscopic plankton living underneath, which serves as the primary food source for fish that penguins eat. Sea ice also provides an important resting platform for the penguins in between foraging dives, so melting can make foraging that much harder. "Global warming may be cutting in on food availability for Emperor penguins," said Dan ...
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Study links global warming with huge algae patches in Arabian Sea, fish mortalities 3.5.2018 DNA: Popular News
Global warming is resulting in massive patches of an algae species in the Arabian Sea that is eating up the planktons and excreting large amounts of ammonia leading to fish mortalities, a joint study conducted by institutes of India and the US has found. The Noctiluca Algae is often reported to occur in patches and blooms in the Northern Arabian Sea. The study also denies any link between the growth of the algae to low oxygen and coastal pollution from major Indian cities along the west coast. These algae patches -- some as big as one-fourth the size of Mumbai -- are observed in the sea north off Mumbai and stretch as far as the Oman coast. The striking green blooms often appear to glow at night due to a special phenomenon called bioluminescence, earning them the nickname "sea sparkle". "Unfortunately, these beautiful patches, indicate zones of decline because fish cannot thrive and sometimes die because of these blooms. Noctiluca voraciously eats one of the most important planktonic organisms at the ...
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Just like his 'Titanic' co-star Kate Winslet, Leonardo DiCaprio too has a beetle named after him 1.5.2018 DNA: Evolutions
Grouvellinus leonardodicaprioi was discovered at a waterfall in the remote Maliau Basin in Malaysian Borneo.
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