User: Genecampaign Topic: Climate Change
Category: Impacts :: Floods n Droughts
Last updated: Sep 19 2018 12:22 IST RSS 2.0
 
1 to 20 of 5,430    
Experts suggest organic, green tea production in Tripura 19.9.2018 The Assam Tribune
Experts suggest organic, green tea production in Tripura
Also found in: [+]
India to generate 100 GW solar energy by 2022: Suresh Prabhu 4.9.2018 Govt of india: PIB
Union Minister of Commerce & Industry and Civil Aviation, Suresh Prabhu said that demand for energy will increase due to rapid development taking place in India and fossil fuel is not going to last forever and therefore there is need for renewable energy.
Also found in: [+]
Careful planning needed to factor in climate changes, feel researchers 1.9.2018 The Assam Tribune
Careful planning needed to factor in climate changes, feel researchers
Also found in: [+]
Nothing abnormal in rainfall activities: expert 22.8.2018 The Assam Tribune
Nothing abnormal in rainfall activities: expert
Also found in: [+]
International team of scientists including 18 Indian scientists decode complex wheat genome 18.8.2018 Govt of india: PIB
In a major scientific breakthrough, a team of international researchers, including 18 from India decoded the wheat genome, considered insurmountable so far. The information generated will help to identify genes controlling complex agronomic traits such as yield, grain quality, resistance to diseases and pests, as well as tolerance to drought, heat, water logging and salinity.
Also found in: [+]
‘Collaborative actions needed to address climate change issues’ 15.8.2018 The Assam Tribune
‘Collaborative actions needed to address climate change issues’
Also found in: [+]
What caused the rain havoc in Kerala 15.8.2018 Rediff: News
'A lot of unauthorised encroachments have taken place in our forest area.'
Also found in: [+]
Greenhouse gases surge to new highs worldwide in 2017: US report 1.8.2018 DNA: India
Planet-warming greenhouse gases surged to new highs as abnormally hot temperatures swept the globe and ice melted at record levels in the Arctic last year due to climate change, a major US report said today. The annual State of the Climate Report, compiled by more than 450 scientists from over 60 countries, describes worsening climate conditions worldwide in 2017, the same year that US President Donald Trump pulled out of the landmark Paris climate deal. The United States is the world's second leading polluter after China, but has rolled back environmental safeguards under Trump, who has declared climate change a "Chinese hoax" and exited the Paris deal signed by more than 190 nations as a path toward curbing harmful emissions. The 300-page report issued by the American Meteorological Society and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration mentioned the word "abnormal" a dozen times, referring to storms, droughts, scorching temperatures and record low ice cover in the Arctic. Last year, the top ...
Also found in: [+]
Mining destroying Meghalaya’s cave systems: Scientist 23.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Mining destroying Meghalaya’s cave systems: Scientist
Also found in: [+]
'We are more interested in the monsoon than anyone else in the world' 16.7.2018 Rediff: News
'It affects our economy, it is very important in many ways.'
Also found in: [+]
Problems mounting for tea producers 13.7.2018 The Assam Tribune
Problems mounting for tea producers
Also found in: [+]
'Rainfall is one of the hardest things to predict' 11.7.2018 Rediff: Interviews
'Temperature and wind can be predicted more easily than rainfall.'
Also found in: [+]
Earth may get twice as hot as predicted 10.7.2018 DNA: Mumbai
The Earth may end up being twice as warm as projected by climate models, even if the world meets the target of limiting global warming to under two degrees Celsius, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that sea levels may rise six metres or more even if Paris climate goals are met. The findings are based on observational evidence from three warm periods over the past 3.5 million years when the world was 0.5-2 degree Celsius warmer than the pre-industrial temperatures of the 19th Century. The research also revealed how large areas of the polar ice caps could collapse and significant changes to ecosystems could see the Sahara Desert become green and the edges of tropical forests turn into fire dominated savanna. "Observations of past warming periods suggest that a number of amplifying mechanisms, which are poorly represented in climate models, increase long-term warming beyond  climate model projections," said Hubertus Fischer from the University of Bern in ...
Also found in: [+]
Strategies needed for future growth of Guwahati 25.6.2018 The Assam Tribune
Strategies needed for future growth of Guwahati
Also found in: [+]
When the hills go thirsty 24.6.2018 DNA: Top News
It is summertime and Shimla is a busy place. There are travellers to be checked-in, woollens to be sold at discounted 'summer' prices and tourists waiting to be shown around the mountain vistas. But, there is one thing whose mention is enough for everyone to pause and reflect on — water or the lack of it. There is an unconcealed unanimity across government offices, hotels and homes in the hill town, commercial establishments on the famous Mall Road and villages on the outskirts that the water crisis this summer is the worst that Shimla has ever faced. While the scarcity has always reared its head each summer, locals and experts admit that the acute crisis, which lasted over three weeks between May 20 and June 12, is unprecedented. "We did not have water for 15 days at a stretch. It was an ordeal for all of us in the neighbourhood. It was especially hard on all the women as taps ran dry even at the public toilets. We had to send our kids to relatives' homes in other cities," said Soma Jaiswal, 77, a ...
Also found in: [+]
DNA Jaipur 10th Anniversary: Technological quick-fixes not a solution, says Sunita Narain 23.6.2018 DNA: India
The challenge of environmental management, of water scarcity in a world which is today more and more in an age of climate change is that of an uncertain future of the most vulnerable.  The fact is that on one hand we are building in floodplains, destroying our water bodies and filling up our water channels. On the other hand, climate change is beginning to show its impact on the monsoon. It is leading to more rain in a fewer number of rainy days, as scientists have predicted. We now see more rain and more extreme rain events.  Last year, up to mid-August, data showed that India had 16 extremely heavy rain events, defined as rainfall over 244 mm in a day, and 100 heavy rain events, defined as rainfall between 124 to 244 mm in a day. This means that rain will become a flood. Worse, in Met records, the rain will be shown as normal, not recognising that it did not rain when it was most needed for sowing or that the rain came in just one downpour. It came and went. It brought no benefits. Only grief. This ...
Also found in: [+]
Speech of Nitin Gadkari in the International Conference on Water for Sustainable Development 20.6.2018 Govt of india: PIB
  Following is the Text of speech delivered by Shri Nitin Gadkari, Union Minister for Water Resources, River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation in the “Conference on International Decade for Action: Water for Sustainable Development 2018-28” held at Dushanbe, Tajikistan:- Tajikistan has taken a leading role to get the theme of water at the centre of global Sustainable Development Goals for the coming decade.
Also found in: [+]
Older Amazonian forests help regulate global climate 4.6.2018 DNA: Top News
Turns out, tall and older Amazonian forests help in regulating global climate system. According to a research conducted by the Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science, photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests - forests above 30m - is three times less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Tropical rainforests play a critical role in regulating the global climate system - they represent the Earth's largest terrestrial CO2 sink. Because of its broad geographical expanse and year-long productivity, the Amazon is the key to the global carbon and hydrological cycles. Climate change could threaten the fate of rainforests, but there is great uncertainty about the future ability of rainforests to store carbon. While severe droughts have occurred in recent years in the Amazon watershed, causing widespread tree mortality and affecting the forests' ability to store carbon, the drivers of tropical rainforests' sensitivity to drought are poorly ...
Also found in: [+]
How global warming has changed your country's climate 1.6.2018 Rediff: News
The above map shows the country wise temperature change from 1990 to 2017 in Fahrenheit.
Also found in: [+]
Strong demand in China, India boost tea consumption and production 29.5.2018 Sify Finance
/AKI) Global tea consumption and production will keep rising over the next decade, driven by robust demand in developing and emerging countries, notably China and India, according to a new report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation Intergovernmental Group.
Also found in: [+]
1 to 20 of 5,430